Sales executive job description

Sales executives are responsible for promoting and selling products and services to customers.

They connect with potential customers (individuals or businesses) and explain the benefits of their products/services, in order to gain agreement for a purchase.

The role is often targeted, meaning that sales executives are required to make a minimum amount of sales every month, quarter or year.

This comprehensive guide includes a full sales executive job description and everything else you need to know about the role, including salaries, skills, weekly duties and more.

 

Guide contents

  • Sales executive job description
  • How much do sales executives earn?
  • What does a sales executive do?
  • Requirements, skills and qualifications
  • Who employs sales executives?
  • Which junior jobs progress to sales executive roles?

 

Sales executive job description

Sales executive | Strive Fitness

 

About Strive Fitness

With five locations around the Midlands, Strive Fitness is focussed on making people happier and healthier. We cater for people of all ages, and will be able to find the gym membership that’s right for you. Whether you’re looking to lose weight or simply be more active, our team at Strive Fitness can help.

 

About the role

We are looking for an engaging sales executive to help grow memberships across our gyms. You will report to the sales manager and take responsibility for locating prospective clients and bringing them into the Strive Fitness family.

 

Responsibilities

  • Generating new sales opportunities by approaching walk-ins, cold calling and networking
  • Contacting prospective customers who have sent enquiries, and converting them to members
  • Conducting gym tours for prospective members and suggesting suitable membership options
  • Preparing new membership documentation, explaining terms to customers and arranging payment methods
  • Establishing relationships with local businesses with the aim of promoting our corporate gym memberships
  • Delivering consistent levels of new member sign ups to the gym
  • Organising open day events where members of the public can tour the gym facilities
  • Preparing regular reports for the sales manager summarising progress against KPIs
  • Representing Strive Fitness at a range of community and fitness events
  • Working closely with the marketing and events teams to leverage existing opportunities

 

Location & commitments

  • Permanent, full time position based in Strive office
  • Flexible working hours based around client meetings
  • Travel required across our five sites

 

Candidate requirements

  • Proven experience in a customer facing role – preferably sales aligned
  • Friendly and outgoing personality
  • Self-starter who can work with little supervision
  • Goal-oriented with the ability to track and achieve KPIs
  • Interest in the health and fitness industry
  • Driver’s licence and access to own transport beneficial

 

Contact us to apply

If you have a passion for the fitness industry and want to help more people achieve their personal wellness goals, send your CV and cover letter to Jane Martin at jane@strive-fitness.co.uk

 

How much do sales executives earn?

Sales executive salaries are usually a combination of a base wage plus performance-related bonuses, with an average base salary of £30,000.

 

Sales executive salaries in the UK

  • Low: £23,000
  • Average: £30,000
  • High: £42,500

Source: Totaljobs

 

Sales executive salaries will vary depending on;

  • Product or service being sold – Often, the more valuable the product/service the executive is selling, the higher their earnings potential will be
  • Performance – With sales roles usually being commission based (meaning staff earn a percentage of the revenue they generate through sales) the more units an executive sells, the more they will earn
  • B2B or B2B – Products being sold to businesses (B2B) will usually be more valuable than products being sold to personal customers (B2C) – therefore B2B sales roles often pay more than B2C
  • General salary factors – Such as level of candidate experience and location

For example, an experienced pharmaceutical sales executive with a strong track record, selling large amounts of expensive products to businesses, will achieve a higher salary than a call-centre sales executive selling individual low-cost homeware products to personal customers.

Remember these figures are averages taken from job advert samples and do not take into account extra benefits like commission, bonuses, overtime and healthcare.

 

What does a sales executive do?

Breaking down the job description jargon, here are the typical tasks and responsibilities that sales executives will carry out in an average work week;

  • Lead generation – Researching and identifying new potential customers to approach, booking sales appointments with them
  • Cold calling – Contacting potential customers by telephone, email or in person to introduce them to the business, service or product they are selling
  • Customer service – Building and maintaining relationships with customers in order to create trust and drive sales
  • Selling product benefits – Explaining the features of products and explaining how they will benefit the customer
  • Creating proposals – Writing quotes and proposals for new and existing customers based on their needs and the products or services best suited to them
  • Maintaining a database – Using a customer relationship management (CRM) system to track customer interactions and sales
  • Closing sales – Persuading customers to agree to purchase a product or service
  • Achieving targets – Meeting targets set by business to achieve a certain amount of unit sales or amount of revenue, in a month, quarter or year
  • Upselling and cross-sellingPersuading customers to upgrade their products, or purchase associated products from them
  • Market research – Monitoring the competitor market to understand how other products and services on the market compare to their own
  • Reporting – Maintaining regular reports for sales managers around goals, sales and prospective clients
  • Networking – Representing the business at a range of events and conferences where there are opportunities to promote the product or service
  • Maintaining product knowledge: Keeping an expert knowledge of their product or service, including updates and variations

 

What do sales executives need?

candidate requirements

Sales executives need to possess a number of skills, experience and sometimes qualifications to fulfil their roles.

Specific requirements may change by industry, but here is an overview of what is needed.

 

Experience

Junior sales executives will usually need candidates to demonstrate experience in a customer service or sales environment. Larger organisations will often offer junior sales positions within their graduate training programs.

Senior sales executives will usually be expected to bring a database of clients or be able to demonstrate their ability to build a client base from scratch. They will also need to have specific product or service knowledge, for example in financial services or pharmaceuticals.

 

Sales executive skills

Sales executives work in a fast-paced, high-pressure workplace where targets are integral to the role so they should be able to demonstrate the following capabilities;

  • Communication skills: Being an active listener and able to communicate effectively by phone, email or in person
  • Relationship management: Building and maintaining ongoing relationships with a client base to achieve repeat sales
  • Confidence: Being able to present the benefits of a product or service with conviction and passion
  • Resilience: The ability to bounce back after rejection and move on to the next sales opportunity
  • Teamwork: Working as part of a broader sales team, and building relationships across departments such as marketing and finance
  • Negotiation: The ability to work out prices and terms with clients, that are agreeable for both parties

And the more industry specific “hard skills” include:

  • Industry knowledge: Thorough understanding of the marketplace within which the product or service is being sold, including competitors
  • Product/service knowledge: An expert knowledge of the product or service being sold is crucial to build trust with customers and make sales
  • Sales ability: Solid skill in dealing with people, building good relationships and consistently close sales

 

Sales executive qualifications

It’s not essential to have a formal qualification to become a sales executive, with many successful candidates able to gain entry level jobs with GCSEs or A levels.

However, in industries where more complex products are sold (e.g. pharmaceuticals, IT etc.)  it may be expected that sales executives have an undergraduate degree in marketing, business, or a field related to a specific product.

There are also specific sales-related qualifications, such as:

 

NVQ Certificate/Diploma in Sales

City & Guilds offer Level 2 and Level 3 sales qualifications to help sales professionals build capabilities in a range of areas such as inbound and outbound telephone sales, processing sales orders and buyer behaviour.

 

Institute of Sales Management (ISM) qualifications

The ISM is the professional membership body for the sales industry, and has a set of regulated qualifications ranging from Levels 2-6. Level 2 is aimed at aspiring sales professionals with little or no experience, while Level 6 is for senior sales roles like directorships.

 

What is expected of sales executives?

Typically, sales executives will be expected to commit to the following;

  • Target achievement – Many sales executives will be contractually required to make a minimum amount of sales of their product/service every month, which will be measured by the number of units they sell, or the revenue they generate
  • Long hours – Due to the target-driven nature of the role, sales executive often work much longer hours than contracted, to ensure they hit targets and earn more commission
  • Frequent travel – Those selling expensive products will often travel to meet customers
  • Location – Normally based at the employer’s office with travel to meet clients

 

Sales executive benefits

Sales executives will have access to a range of benefits over and above their base salaries, including:

  • Commission – Sales executives will normally receive a percentage of the revenue generated from sales they have made. High performers making plenty of sales, can see salaries hugely increased with commission.
  • Performance-related bonuses – In addition to commission
  • Pension plans
  • Healthcare
  • Training and development
  • Corporate discounts
  • Company cars
  • Petrol and phone allowance

 

 

Who employs sales executives?

Employers

Any business that sells a product or service could potentially benefit from the services of a sales executive – helping them to secure customers, make sales and generate revenue.

Larger organisations will have whole teams of salespeople, whereas smaller businesses may have just a couple of employees focusing on sales and business development.

Sales executive employers can be divided into 2 main categories;

  • Business2Business (B2B) – Those who sell their products/services to other businesses
  • Business2Consumer (B2C) – Those who sell their products/services to individuals

Although some companies will have both a B2B and a B2C department. For example, Microsoft sell different types of software to businesses and personal computer users.

However, a sales executive will usually work solely in one of these categories, focusing their efforts on one type of customer.

Here are some typical employers of sales executives and what they would hire them to sell:

  Example B2B products Example B2C products
Software providers Business email services Home PC operating systems
Financial services Business loans Home insurance
Consumer electronics Phones, TVs, printers
Pharmaceuticals Hospital drugs, equipment etc.
FMCG Food and drinks to supermarkets
Automotive Car fleets to businesses Cars to personal customers
Magazines/Newspapers Advertising space

 

Which junior jobs progress to sales executive roles?

Sales executives are entry-level positions, usually recruited straight from school or university. It may help candidates if they have gained customer-facing experience in retail (such as sales assistant) or hospitality roles, which will demonstrate their understanding of customer interactions.

 

Which senior jobs do sales executives progress to?

Promotions

Sales executives can progress within the sales industry or choose to branch out into other areas of commerce.

 

Sales manager

Sales managers are supervisory staff who are responsible for recruiting, training and managing a team of sales staff for a business or department.

 

Sales executive job description – conclusion

A career in sales can be high-stakes when it comes to meeting quotas and KPIs, but many candidates flourish in this dynamic work environment.

There are plenty of opportunities to exceed financial targets and build on a good base salary, as well as a clear career pathway across a range of different industries.

Project coordinator job description

Project coordinators support project teams by managing information and resources, helping to deliver projects on time and within budget.

Reporting to a project manager, they deliver a range of coordination and administrative duties that keep teams on track, and clients updated throughout the life of the project.

This comprehensive guide includes a full project coordinator job description and everything else you need to know about the role, including salaries, skills, progression opportunities and more.

 

Guide contents

  • Project coordinator job description
  • How much do project coordinators earn?
  • What does a project coordinator do?
  • Requirements, skills and qualifications
  • Who employs project coordinators?
  • Which junior jobs progress to project coordinator roles?

 

Project coordinator job description

Project coordinator | Bright Energy

 

About Bright Energy

Bright Energy provides engineering and construction services for renewable energy projects across the UK. We deliver a range of energy solutions including solar and wind project design and construction, as well as energy storage.

 

About the role

We are seeking a capable project coordinator to support the delivery of our exciting and challenging renewable energy projects. Reporting to the project manager, you will perform a range of administrative and support functions that ensure the projects are delivered on time and within budget.

 

Responsibilities

  • Maintaining and monitoring project schedules, ensuring that all tasks are being completed on time
  • Monitoring project budget, including financial performance and resource planning
  • Organising and attending stakeholder meetings, taking minutes and distributing
  • Compiling project status reports and presentations for senior management and clients
  • Identifying and assessing project risks, and reporting to the project manager
  • Providing assistance with business development, including coordinating, tracking, and writing project proposals
  • Providing administrative support as needed, including filing paperwork, taking meeting notes and taking meeting notes

 

Location & commitments

  • Permanent, full time position
  • Standard business hours (9am – 5.30pm)
  • Based at our offices in Durham, with some travel required

 

Candidate requirements

Essential:

  • Demonstrated experience supporting a project through from initiation to completion
  • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills
  • Ability to work with senior project staff and stakeholders
  • Competency in Microsoft Office suite, including MS Project
  • Ability to work under tight deadlines

Desirable:

  • Experience in utility related construction; wind and solar experience a plus
  • Prince2 foundation level

 

Contact us to apply

If you think your experience matches our description above, please send your cover letter and CV to our HR Manager, Josie Paterson at josie.paterson@brightenergy.co.uk

 

How much do project coordinators earn?

Project coordinators are well-paid roles with an average salary of £31,500 and plenty of scope for increasing pay with promotions.

 

Project coordinator salaries in the UK

  • Low: £25,000
  • Average: £31,500
  • High: £40,000

Source: Totaljobs

 

Project coordinator salaries will vary depending on;

  • The industry of the employer – e.g. is the role working for a construction company or a telecommunications brand?
  • The type of project – e.g. is the project a company-wide software upgrade or building a new shopping centre?
  • Size and cost of project – e.g. Is the project a small local project costing a few thousand pounds? Or a huge global project costing millions of pounds?
  • General salary factors – such as level of candidate experience and location

For example, project coordinators working on multi-million pound global IT rollout projects, will earn more than those working on a small office-relocation project costing a few thousand pounds.

Remember these figures are averages taken from job advert samples and do not take into account extra benefits like bonuses, overtime and healthcare.

 

What does a project coordinator do?

Breaking down the job description jargon, here are the typical tasks and responsibilities that project coordinators will carry out in an average work week;

  • Project scheduling – Creating and coordinating the project schedule, ensuring team are aware of plans, milestones and progress
  • Budget reporting – Updating the project manager and members of the project team on the budget, including raising any issues with overspending
  • Assisting the project manager – Providing ad hoc support to the project manager
  • Reporting – Preparing presentations and reports for senior management to update them on the progress of the project
  • Administration – Providing support to the project team in terms of taking meeting notes, filing and answering phones
  • Organising meetings – Scheduling and leading meetings with project teams, clients and other stakeholders
  • Preparing and maintaining project documents – Keeping accurate records of all project paperwork including trackers, schedules, stakeholder briefings and budgets
  • Communications – Distributing communications to project team via email, such as updates and instructions from project manager

 

What do project coordinators need?

candidate requirements

Project coordinators need a range of skills, experience and sometimes qualifications in order to deliver their roles effectively.

Specific requirements may change by industry, but here is an overview of what is needed.

 

Experience

Project coordinators will be expected to have some exposure to working in a project environment, supporting as either an administrator or assistant. They will need to demonstrate an understanding of how projects are delivered and have the ability to create and read project documentation, such as schedules, budgets and reports.

 

Project coordinator skills

Project coordinators work in a fast-paced environment where they need to demonstrate the following capabilities;

  • Communication skills: Being able to communicate directions and updates, and actively listen to the needs of different stakeholders
  • Attention to detail: Accurately collecting and distributing project information is crucial to project success
  • Interpersonal skills: Building relationships and rapport with a range of people including co-workers, clients and stakeholders
  • Problem solving: Addressing issues promptly and ensuring the project gets back on track as quickly as possible
  • Time management: Tightly controlling the project schedule and ensuring all team members are meeting their deadlines
  • Multi-tasking: Managing multiple projects or sub-projects
  • Teamwork: Working closely with project teams across a range of skillsets, and providing support to senior members of staff including the project manager

And the more industry specific “hard skills” include:

  • Project frameworks: Project coordinators must have a good understanding of popular project delivery framework, such as Prince2 or Agile.
  • Reporting: Reporting large amounts of project data (financial, progress, risks and issues etc) requires the ability to take raw data and turn it into easily readable documents for management
  • Project management software: Most modern projects are tracked and managed using project software such as Microsoft Project or Basecamp

 

Project coordinator qualifications

While not essential to have formal qualifications, some larger companies prefer that project coordinators have project management qualifications that are well-regarded across the industry.

 

APM (Association for Project Management) qualification

APM, the chartered body for the project management profession, offers three levels of qualifications; Project Fundamentals, Project Management and Project Professional. The courses are available through classroom, e-learning and distance learning and finish with an exam at each level.

 

PRINCE2

PRINCE2 (PRojects IN Controlled Environments) is a globally-recognised project management methodology, providing best-practice process for delivering projects. There are courses available across the UK delivered online or in classroom, and two levels of certification; PRINCE2 Foundation and PRINCE2 Practitioner – foundation being ideal for junior level project staff, such as coordinators.

 

What is expected of a project coordinator?

Typically, a project coordinator will be expected to commit to the following;

  • Standard business hours – (35 – 40 hours per week) with some overtime in the lead up to project deadlines
  • Occasional evening or weekend work – dependent on project milestones
  • Location – Normally based at the employer’s office – sometimes travel to project site will be required

 

Project coordinator benefits

Project coordinators usually work for large organisations and have access to a range of additional benefits including:

  • Pension plans
  • Healthcare
  • Training and development
  • Corporate discounts

 

 

Who employs project coordinators?

Employers

Project coordinators are usually employed to support large project teams for organisations undergoing change – which means that it’s normally large companies or public sector divisions who hire them.

Industries which typically employ project coordinators include:

  • Consultancies – Companies who outsource project management services to other firms
  • IT
  • Telecommunications
  • Healthcare
  • Financial services
  • Law
  • Construction
  • Engineering
  • Management consultancy
  • Marketing and media
  • Government
  • Charities
  • Oil and gas

 

Which junior jobs progress to project coordinator roles?

While project coordinators are relatively junior positions, they do have responsibility for overseeing the administrative functions of the project. In order to gain this experience, project coordinators may have started in the following roles:

 

Project administrator

In larger project teams, project administrators will provide support in terms of filing documents, taking meeting notes and coordinating diaries.

Project support officer

Project support officers are junior staff who are responsible for monitoring schedules and budgets, and preparing reports.

 

Which senior jobs do project coordinators progress to?

There are many opportunities for project coordinators to build their project management experience or branch out to other areas of a business, such as:

 

Project manager

Project managers hold ultimate responsibility for the delivery of the project, from initiation to completion. They often have a number of direct reports, and need to delegate tasks and allocate resources across the project team.

 

Project coordinator job description – conclusion

Project coordinators work within a fast-paced, challenging environment but it can be an exciting career choice, with the potential to work in a range of industries.

Generally well-paid and with a clear pathway for progression, the role of a project coordinator will be fulfilling for candidates who enjoy multi-tasking and working with teams of people.

Program manager job description

Program managers oversee the delivery of large groups of associated projects, known as programs.

With numerous project managers reporting to them, they must ensure that all projects within their program are delivered effectively, and the results compliment the long-term strategy of their employer’s business.

This detailed guide includes a full programme manager job description and everything else you need to know about program managers, including salaries, skills, qualifications, typical employers and more.

 

Guide contents

  • Program manager job description
  • How much do program managers earn?
  • What does a program manager do?
  • Requirements, skills and qualifications
  • Who employs program managers?
  • Which junior jobs progress to program manager roles?

 

Program manager job description

Technology Program manager |The County Council

 

About The County Council

The County Council has a forward-thinking approach that supports a modern and efficient local authority. We know that the right technology can support and transform services, improve outcomes for our residents, and boost the performance and productivity of our staff.

 

About the role

We have a fixed term vacancy for a Program Manager to lead on a major technology initiative, replacing our Adult Social Care business management system with a £10m program of works that will encompass wide-ranging technology projects

 

Responsibilities

  • Working closely with the CTO as day-to-day lead on the program
  • Developing objectives for program and associated projects, in line with business strategy
  • Developing program roadmaps and setting delivery dates with project managers
  • Gaining buy-in and funding from program stakeholders
  • Forecasting and budgeting for program and creating cost reports
  • Creating program progress evaluation system and rolling out across program
  • Providing regular reports to stakeholders and senior leadership
  • Provide leadership and guidance to program team and project managers

 

Location & commitments

  • Permanent, full-time role at our London office Monday-Friday
  • Occasional site visits across the County
  • Occasional weekend work and overtime may be required

 

Candidate requirements

  • Experience of large-scale technology implementation programs delivered on time, with high quality results – ideally in the public sector
  • Experience managing diverse teams across multiple national locations
  • Able to resolve cross-program risks and strategic issues with senior stakeholders
  • A recognised project management qualification such as Prince2 or PMP
  • A program management qualification such as MSP is preferred
  • Strong reporting and stakeholder management abilities

 

Contact us to apply

If you’d like to apply for this role, please contact our CTO, Bob Hope, at bob.hope@tcc.co.uk

Attach your CV and tell us why you would be a great fit for the team.

 

How much do program managers earn?

Program management is a very well-paid profession, with an average salary of £62,500

 

Programme manager salaries in the UK

  • Low: £42,500
  • Average: £62,500
  • High: £82,500

Source: TotalJobs

 

Program manager salaries will vary hugely depending on:

  • The industry of the employer – Does the program manager work for a bank? IT company? Charity? Local council?
  • The type of programs being managed – Programs could be anything from IT system roll outs and business restructures, to home building or office moves
  • Size and cost of programs being managed – Does the program incorporate 5 small projects at a cost of £1m? Or 50 large projects at a cost of £500m?
  • General salary factors – such as level of candidate qualifications, experience and location

For example, a senior program manager leading a £100m program of 50 large-scale IT projects, will usually earn more than a junior program manager leading a £5m program of 5 housing development projects.

Bear in mind that these are average figures taken from job advert samples, and they do not include extra benefits such as bonuses, overtime and non-financial benefits such as healthcare.

 

What does a program manager do?

Breaking down the job description jargon, here are the typical tasks and responsibilities that program managers will carry out in the delivery of large programs:

  • Initiating programs – Analyse business needs and suggesting programs needed to meet long-term objectives
  • Developing programs – Identifying and developing new programs to support the company’s strategy, defining objectives for programs and associated projects
  • Organising programs – Organising projects within programs and developing roadmaps and teams to deliver program objectives
  • Securing funding – Persuading investors and stakeholders (people with a stake in the program) to release funding for program and projects
  • Forecasting and budgeting – Estimating the cost of delivering programs and monitoring spending throughout all projects
  • Developing evaluation methods – Creating systems and metrics for measuring program success
  • Monitoring and reporting progress – Making sure programs remain on time and meet goals including customer satisfaction, safety, quality and team member performance.
  • Stakeholder reporting – Preparing and delivering reports to senior management and stakeholders with progress updates
  • Risk assessment and management – Identifying, analysing and mitigating program risks
  • People management – Recruiting and managing project managers, providing direction, guidance and coaching

 

What do programme managers need?

candidate requirements

Program managers need a range of project-based skills, experience, knowledge and sometimes qualifications in order to carry out the job effectively.

Exact requirements will depend on the type of programs managed, but generally speaking… here’s what’s needed.

 

Experience

Program Managers need extensive program management experience with a solid track record of delivering programs in line with business strategy – or at least project management experience at a senior level. They will also usually require a solid understanding of the particular industry or program type they intend to work within.

 

Program manager skills

Program managers need a blend of skills to be able to manage programs that achieve business goals:

  • Strategic thinking: ‘Big picture’ thinking to make sure projects align with business goals
  • Organisation: Coordinating time, budget and resources to complete work within program guidelines
  • Analysis: Programs create large amounts of financial, statistical and other forms of data. Program managers must be able to quickly analyse this data to make fact-based decisions.
  • Problem solving: Dealing with unexpected issues to reduce or eliminate their effect on the program or individual projects
  • Leadership: Able to lead a team and manage their activities. Able to inspire team members, set the program vision and motivate colleagues.
  • Communication: Program managers must be able to communicate priorities and constraints, and update stakeholders on how programs are progressing.
  • Influence and negotiation: These skills are required to secure funding and push programs forward when dealing with numerous conflicting interests
  • Risk management: Identifying and managing risks and issues in programs to reduce their impact

And the more industry specific “hard skills” include:

  • Project and program frameworks: knowledge of best practice processes for delivering projects, such as Prince2, PMP and Agile
  • Project area knowledge: Knowledge of the programme/projects being delivered, e.g. construction, IT, HR etc.
  • Commercial knowledge: An understanding of business operations and finances to ensure programs align with employer goals

 

Program manager qualifications

Programme management is a complex profession and as such, training and qualifications can be hugely beneficial to those in the role. Most qualifications are based around project/programme frameworks which are internationally recognised guidelines or the delivery of projects and programs.

 

MSP (Managing Successful Programmes) certification

The MSP framework from Axelos provides a best practice framework for delivering programmes in the UK, and their certifications prove the holders’ competence in delivering programmes effectively.

 

Prince2

Prince2 (PRojects IN Controlled Environments) is the most widely recognised project management certification in the UK, Europe and Australia.

It is a framework for delivering projects which helps to provide a structured approach and ensures that people across the industry work to the same procedures.

Prince2 qualifications teach the framework to people who undertake them, and ultimately provide them with proof that they have a sound understanding of it.

There are 2 levels of Prince2 qualification:

  • Prince2 foundation
  • Prince2 practitioner

 

PMP

PMP is more recognised outside of Europe (particularly in the USA) and is considered by many to be a more in-depth qualification than Prince2.

 

Agile

Agile is relatively new project management framework, designed specifically to deliver products or service projects and is popular in the software industry.

 

Industry certification can also be gained through the Association of Project Managers (APM) and the Project Management Institute (PMI).

 

Subject matter qualifications

It can be beneficial for program managers to hold qualifications in the subject of the types of program they will be managing. For example, an engineering program manager would benefit from having a degree or vocational qualification in engineering.

 

What is expected of program managers?

Typically, program managers will be expected to commit the following:

  • Full time hours – (35 – 40 hours per week) with occasional overtime needed as programs near their deadline
  • Possibility of occasional evening or weekend work where program work needs to be carried out outside of the employer’s core business hours
  • Location – normally based at employer’s office
  • Some travel to project sites or stakeholder offices

 

Program manager benefits

As program managers tend to work for larger companies, they will usually receive a good benefits packages, including things like:

  • Bonuses – based on business performance
  • Pension
  • Healthcare
  • Car allowance
  • Corporate discounts

 

 

Who employs program managers?

Employers

Due to the ongoing need for business transformation programs to be undertaken across all sectors of the UK, program management skills are in strong demand across all industries in both the private and public sector.

Large national and international companies tend to employ program managers frequently, whereas small companies have less need to run multiple projects – which need a program manager to oversee them.

Typical program management employers include companies within:

  • Construction
  • Banking
  • Retail
  • Digital
  • HR
  • Healthcare
  • Legal
  • IT
  • Consulting
  • Oil and gas
  • Government
  • Not for profit / charity

 

Which junior jobs progress to program manager roles?

Aside from trainee/graduate programmes, there are a number of jobs which see employees naturally progress into program manager roles. These include:

 

Project manager

Project managers lead single projects (often within programs) and are responsible for delivering their objectives and managing project teams. Once they have gained experience, project managers often wish to move into program management – a more strategic role that has a greater impact in the company.

 

Which senior jobs do program managers progress to?

Even though program management is a great career choice in its own right, it can also be a springboard into some of the most senior and higher paid jobs in a company, such as:

 

COO

COO (chief operating officer) is a senior executive role overseeing the day-to-day operational functions of a company or area. Program managers’ experience in executing programs in line with business strategy, makes them ideal candidates for such a strategic role.

 

Programme manager job description – conclusion

Program manager is a very senior strategic job with a strong demand for qualified individuals from large national and global organisations. It requires years of project-based experience and sound project framework knowledge to carry out the role effectively.

It pays well above the current national average salary, offers challenging and rewarding work as well as plenty of attractive career progression opportunities.

Chef de partie job description

A chef de partie works in a professional kitchen and is responsible for one specific area of food preparation such as vegetables, fish or sauces.

They report to the sous chef, and often have a more junior chef, known as a commis chef, supporting them.

Working as part of a broader kitchen team, they also need to make sure they meet food quality, safety and hygiene standards – to ensure great food is delivered to customers.

This comprehensive guide includes a full chef de partie job description and everything else you need to know about the role, including salaries, skills, progression opportunities and more.

 

Guide contents

  • Chef de partie job description
  • How much do chefs de partie earn?
  • What does a chef de partie do?
  • Requirements, skills and qualifications
  • Who employs chefs de partie?
  • Which junior jobs progress to chef de partie roles?

 

Chef de partie job description

Chef de partie | Brace & Co Catering

 

About Brace & Co Catering

For nearly 30 years, Brace & Co Catering have been delivering tasty, homestyle food to businesses, schools and healthcare settings across Sheffield. Our passionate and qualified team develop tasty dishes based on seasonal, local produce.

 

About the role

We are looking for a chef de partie to join our busy team, where you will be responsible for the pastry section. Reporting to the sous chef, you will work closely with the rest of the catering team in delivering established dishes to a high standard.

 

Responsibilities

  • Prepare and cook a range of pastry products including tarts, cakes and frozen desserts in line with the head chef’s menus
  • Run the pastry section of the kitchen with minimal supervision
  • Supervise a commis chef during each shift, providing training and mentoring on the job
  • Uphold the quality standards set by the head chef across all dishes produced by the section
  • Offer menu and dish suggestions to the head and sous chef, using your knowledge of pastry and what the Brace & Co Catering brand represents
  • Manage stock levels throughout the shift, and report any issues with ordering or wastage to the head chef
  • Keep your work area clean and sanitary, adhering to all health and safety regulations
  • Provide support to the sous and head chefs when required

 

Location & commitments

  • Permanent, full time position
  • Standard Monday-Friday shifts with some weekend work required
  • Based at our catering facility in Sheffield

 

Candidate requirements

  • Experience as a chef de partie working on a pastry section
  • Ability to multitask and work efficiently under pressure
  • Awareness and understanding of culinary trends, particularly within the pastry arts
  • Knowledge of health and safety regulations
  • Culinary school diploma preferred
  • Driver’s licence and access to own transport beneficial

 

Contact us to apply

We’d love to hear from you if you are an ambitious and passionate pastry line cook. Please send your CV and cover letter through to Amy Smith at amy.smith@brace-catering.co.uk

 

How much do chefs de partie earn?

The chef de partie is a mid-level position within the kitchen, with an average salary of £23,000 and plenty of progression available

 

Chef de partie salaries in the UK

  • Low: £21,000
  • Average: £23,000
  • High: £26,406

Source: Totaljobs

 

Chef de partie salaries will vary depending on;

  • The type of food being prepared – e.g. simple sandwiches, Italian cuisine, fine dining etc.
  • The type of establishment – e.g. is the role in a Michelin-starred restaurant? Local pub? Or a school canteen?
  • The size of the kitchen – e.g. is the chef working independently in a small kitchen or supervising a large team of kitchen staff?
  • General salary factors – such as level of candidate experience and location

For example, chefs de partie working in large, city-based Michelin-star restaurants will often be paid more because of the exacting standards required by the venue. On the other hand, chefs de partie working in small catering venues may not be paid as much.

Remember these figures are averages taken from job advert samples and do not take into account extra benefits like bonuses, overtime and healthcare.

 

What does a chef do?

Breaking down the job description jargon, here are the typical tasks and responsibilities that chefs de partie will carry out in an average work week;

  • Managing their section – Chef de parties will be responsible for a single section of the kitchen, such as:
    • Pastry
    • Fish
    • Vegetables
    • Meat
    • Sauces
    • Fried food
    • Grilled food
  • Preparing food – Chopping, cooking and presenting high quality dishes from within the chosen section
  • Managing stock – Monitoring the quality of ingredients, estimating daily production needs and reducing wastage
  • Menu development – Working with the sous chef and head chef to create recipes and ideas for dishes
  • Staff supervision – Training and mentoring commis chefs, and supervising their work during service periods
  • Health and safety – Keeping workspaces clean and hygienic at all times, in line with food safety regulations
  • Maintaining equipment – Checking equipment within the section and reporting any issues to the head chef
  • Supporting senior staff – Providing ongoing support throughout a meal service to more senior members of the kitchen team such as the sous chef and head chef

 

What do chefs de partie need?

candidate requirements

Chefs de partie need culinary skills, experience and sometimes qualifications in order to deliver their roles effectively.

Each kitchen is different so requirements might change, but generally here is an overview of what is needed.

 

Experience

Chefs de partie will need to have spent time working in a kitchen, likely as a commis or junior chef. They should understand the basics of food preparation and how a kitchen operates during a busy meal service. Some chefs de partie will need to demonstrate abilities and experience in their chosen section, for example in pastry.

 

Chef de partie skills

Chefs de partie work in a high-pressured, highly creative environment, so need to have the following capabilities;

  • Autonomy: Being able to work with little supervision and with a full grasp of what’s required throughout the shift
  • Multi-tasking: Managing multiple orders coming in to the section and delivering them within appropriate timeframes
  • Quality control: Ensuring all plates of food are delivered to the head chef’s standards
  • Stress management: Working in a high-pressured environment
  • Creativity: Developing new ideas for recipes and dishes for the section, and pitching them to the head chef
  • Teamwork: Working closely with chefs de partie in other areas of the kitchen, and with more senior team members

And the more industry specific “hard skills” include:

  • Cooking skills: Chopping, food preparation, frying, sauce creation and understanding of flavours
  • Food produce knowledge: A basic understanding of all produce including meat, fish, vegetables etc. and their seasonality
  • Kitchen process: Knowing how a kitchen needs to operate in order to run effectively and safely
  • Food and safety knowledge: Knowledge of health and safety regulations, and how they need to be applied within a kitchen environment

 

Chefs de partie qualifications

Some chefs de partie don’t have formal qualifications and have worked their way up through the ranks of a kitchen.

However, candidates aspiring to work in fine-dining venues will often need to have completed formal training within a respected culinary school.

 

Level 2 NVQ Diploma in Professional Cookery

This qualification offered by City & Guilds is broken into four mandatory units and 11 optional units. It is designed for junior chefs currently working in the industry or students progressing from a Level 1 qualification. The curriculum allows chefs to explore culinary topics such as preparing poultry, making basic stocks and preparing basic pastry products.

 

Le Cordon Bleu Grand Diplôme

This nine-month course is world-renowned and provides training in classical French cooking techniques. Students can choose between the Diplôme de Cuisine or the Diplôme de Patisserie.

 

Leiths diploma in food and wine

A three term diploma from the world renowned Leiths school of food and wine provides students with a sound and broad understanding of food, wine and restaurant business management, through practical sessions and tests.

 

 

What is expected of chefs de partie?

Typically, chefs de partie will be expected to commit to the following;

  • Extended hours – Chefs de partie will often manage their sections for multiple services within a day, including both lunch and dinner
  • Regular evening or weekend – work depending on the venue’s opening hours
  • Location – Normally based at a restaurant or catering venue
  • Physical demands including working all day standing up and needing to lift heavy equipment or produce

 

Chef de partie benefits

Chefs de partie generally work in venues such as restaurants or private companies so typically have access to benefits, including:

  • Training and development
  • Optional pension plans
  • Medical insurance
  • Free meals during shifts
  • Corporate discounts

 

 

Who employs chefs de partie?

Employers

Chefs de partie will often be employed to work within large kitchen teams with a strict hierarchy, such as restaurants or mass catering companies.

Smaller restaurants or pubs will quite often not require a chef de partie to look after a specific section, but may have mid-level chefs working under a different job title.

Typical chef de partie employers include:

  • Fine-dining restaurants
  • Bistros and family restaurants
  • Education settings like schools, colleges and universities
  • Healthcare settings like hospitals and residential homes
  • The Armed Forces
  • Private catering companies
  • Cruise ships

 

Which junior jobs progress to chef de partie roles?

Within the catering industry, there is a fairly rigid career pathway with most restaurants employing chefs at each level. Most chefs de partie start with the following role:

 

Commis chef

The commis chef is the most junior member of the food preparation team, and usually assists a chef de partie on a specific section. They will help with preparing and cooking elements of the dish.

 

Which senior jobs do chefs de partie progress to?

Chefs de partie can progress to a number of roles within the catering industry, and choose to specialise in a particular style of cooking or cuisine.

 

Sous chef

The sous chef is the head chef’s deputy and will support them with the running of the kitchen. Sous chefs will also be involved in food preparation and plating, and will step in for the head chef when they are not available.

Head chef

Head chefs are responsible for overseeing the operations of the whole kitchen, and managing quality control for each dish served. They design the menu, manage the kitchen’s operating budget and lead the kitchen team.

 

Chef de partie job description – conclusion

The chef de partie is a role that requires passion and enthusiasm, and can offer a fulfilling career in the catering industry.

While the hours may not always be the most sociable, it is a role with plenty of opportunities to progress.

Chef job description

A chef is in charge of the preparation of food in a kitchen setting, creating great tasting food, and ensuring it reaches customers on time.

They lead a team of kitchen staff and are responsible for ensuring the kitchen runs efficiently throughout each food service, while meeting quality and hygiene standards.

This detailed guide includes a full chef job description and everything else you need to know about chefs, including salaries, skills, responsibilities and more.

 

Guide contents

  • Chef job description
  • How much do chefs earn?
  • What does a chef do?
  • Requirements, skills and qualifications
  • Who employs chefs?
  • Which junior jobs progress to chef roles?

 

Chef job description

Chef |Birch Restaurant

 

About Birch Restaurant

Here at Birch Restaurant, we’ve created a name for ourselves by sourcing and serving food straight from the forest to the plate. Our innovative, award-winning menu is changed weekly, and is centred on “root to stalk” dining.

 

About the role

We are looking for a chef to join our busy kitchen based in Dorset. You will oversee a team of 12, and work closely with the front-of-house manager to ensure great tasting food is served efficiently to our customers.

 

Responsibilities

  • Develop and plan our weekly menu inspired by local, seasonal produce
  • Oversee the preparation and production of dishes throughout each service, ensuring they meet our high-quality standards
  • Lead our culinary team of 12 kitchen staff, including ongoing training and mentoring
  • Help the team with food preparation and plating during busy periods
  • Monitor stock levels, order ingredients and manage suppliers
  • Oversee the kitchen budget and ensure steps are taken to minimise overhead costs and food wastage
  • Adhere to all health and safety regulations, including safe preparation and storage of food and maintaining a safe work environment
  • Monitor kitchen equipment and organising repairs or replacements when needed

 

Location & commitments

  • Permanent, full time position
  • May be required to work weekends, evenings and holidays
  • Based at our restaurant in Dorset

 

Candidate requirements

  • Extensive experience working in restaurant kitchens, ideally with a plant-based focus
  • Solid understanding of different culinary techniques and flavour profiles
  • Experience managing a team of kitchen staff
  • Awareness and understanding of culinary trends
  • Knowledge of health and safety regulations
  • Basic computer skills including Microsoft Office
  • Culinary school diploma preferred

 

Contact us to apply

If you’d like to join our passionate team, please send your CV and cover letter to our restaurant manager Chris at Chris.Ryan@birch-restaurant.co.uk

 

How much do chefs earn?

Salaries for chefs are in line with the rest of the hospitality industry, with an average salary of £27,000

 

Chef salaries in the UK

  • Low: £22,492
  • Average: £27,000
  • High: £32,500

Source: Totaljobs

 

Chef salaries will vary depending on;

  • The type of food being prepared – e.g. simple sandwiches, Italian cuisine, fine dining etc.
  • The type of establishment – e.g. is the role in a Michelin-starred restaurant? Local pub? Or a school canteen?
  • The size of the kitchen – e.g. is the chef working independently in a small kitchen or supervising a large team of kitchen staff?
  • General salary factors – Such as level of candidate experience and location

For example, chefs working in large fine dining establishments in major cities will be required to possess a more advanced skillset and culinary knowledge, so will be paid more than a chef working in a mass-catering venue or local pub.

Keep in mind that these figures are averaged out and don’t take into account any additional benefits or bonuses that may come with the job.

 

What does a chef do?

Breaking down the job description jargon, here are the typical tasks and responsibilities that a chef will carry out in an average work week;

  • Planning menus – Designing menus and dishes that fit with the venue’s style and brand
  • Overseeing meal preparation – Supervising the production of all dishes delivered by the venue to the customers
  • Quality control – Reviewing dishes before they are served, and tasting food as it is being prepared to ensure it meets appropriate quality standards
  • Food preparation – Supporting kitchen staff with food preparation during busy periods
  • Supervising staff – Overseeing a team of kitchen staff, including preparing rotas, recruiting and training
  • Budget management – Being responsible for the kitchen budget, including the ordering of ingredients and reducing wastage
  • Vendor management – Sourcing the best food produce available within set budgets and managing relationships with suppliers
  • Health and safety – Ensuring a safe work space, and training staff in health and safety regulations to reduce accidents and risk of foodborne illnesses
  • Maintaining equipment – Monitoring quality of kitchen equipment, and organising repairs and replacements when required

 

What do chefs need?

candidate requirements

Chefs need a range of skills, experience, knowledge and sometimes qualifications in order to carry out the job effectively.

Exact requirements will often depend on the venue and the size of the kitchen team, but here is a general summary of what’s required.

 

Experience

Chefs will need differing levels of experience depending on their seniority. These are the main chef career stages

  • Commis chef (junior) – This is the entry level for chefs and can be gained straight from school or college (especially after any kind of culinary training) or after gaining some more junior experience such as kitchen porter or dish washer
  • Chef de Partie (mid level) – This role involves managing a particular station in the kitchen (such as fish, poultry, pastry etc.) and will require a few years of experience as a Commis chef
  • Head chef (senior) – This is the most senior role in the kitchen, managing all other chef staff, and so requires many years of experience within the industry

 

Chef skills

Chefs need to be able to run kitchens in busy and sometimes stressful situations, so need to possess the following:

  • Creativity: Applying knowledge of food preparation and trends to plan and deliver exciting dishes
  • Leadership: Directing and inspiring teams of kitchen staff and leading by example
  • Multi-tasking: Overseeing a large numbers of orders throughout each shift and ensuring each dish is prepared to a high standard
  • Stress management: Working in a high-pressured environment with competing priorities
  • Attention to detail: Enforcing quality control to ensure that all dishes served are consistent and meet the standards of the establishment

And the more industry specific “hard skills” include:

  • Cooking skills: Solid abilities in chopping, food preparation, frying, sauce creation and understanding of flavours
  • Food produce knowledge: A sound understanding of all produce including meat, fish, vegetables etc. and their seasonality
  • Kitchen process: Knowing how a kitchen needs to operate in order to run effectively and safely
  • Food and safety knowledge: Understanding of health and safety regulations including how to prepare and store food, and ensuring the kitchen is a safe place to work for employees

 

Chef qualifications

It is not essential to have formal qualifications when working as a chef, with many chefs working their way up from other kitchen staff jobs or apprenticeships.

However, venues like fine-dining catering companies and Michelin-starred restaurants will often expect candidates to have completed a diploma at a respected culinary school.

 

Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Professional Cookery

City & Guilds offers this qualification for experienced chefs already working in the industry, who are looking to improve their existing skills. It covers topics such as developing working relationships with colleagues, food safety and health and safety of the working environment. There is also the opportunity to specialise in areas of cooking like fish preparation or healthy dishes in the optional units.

 

Le Cordon Bleu Grand Diplôme

This nine-month course is highly respected and covers all the techniques of classical French cuisine. Students can choose between the Diplôme de Cuisine or the Diplôme de Patisserie.

 

Leiths diploma in food and wine

A three term diploma from the world renowned Leiths school of food and wine provides students with a sound and broad understanding of food, wine and restaurant business management, through practical sessions and tests.

 

What is expected of chefs?

Typically, chefs will be expected to commit to the following;

  • Long hours – It’s not uncommon for chefs to work 12-hour shifts, covering both lunch and dinner services
  • Regular evening or weekend work – In line with venue opening times
  • Location – Normally based at a restaurant or catering venue
  • Physical demands including being on your feet for extended periods of time in a hot kitchen
  • Uniform – Chefs will normally have to wear chef whites, or a similar outfit provided by the employer

 

Chef benefits

Chefs usually work in restaurants or private companies so have access to a number of benefits, including things like:

  • Training and development
  • Optional pension plans
  • Medical insurance
  • Free meals during shifts
  • Corporate discounts (in bigger organisations)

 

 

Who employs chefs?

Employers

Chefs can be employed anywhere food is being prepared and served to paying customers.

Restaurants are the most common employer, but there are a range of industries that need help with catering.

Typical chef employers include:

  • Restaurants
  • Pubs and gastropubs
  • Education settings like schools, colleges and universities
  • Healthcare settings like hospitals and residential homes
  • The Armed Forces
  • Private catering companies
  • Cruise ships
  • Office complexes with onsite catering
  • Wealthy individuals and families

 

Which junior jobs progress to chef roles?

The career pathway to becoming a chef is linear, with most employees in the industry holding these roles before becoming a chef.

 

Commis chef

The commis chef is the most junior member of the food preparation team, and usually assists a chef de partie on a specific section. They will help with preparing and cooking elements of dishes.

Chef de partie

Also known as a station chef or line cook, the chef de partie is responsible for the running of one section of the kitchen, for example the grill or the fry. They can also be in charge of the preparation and cooking of one core ingredient such as fish or vegetables.

Sous chef

The sous chef is the kitchen’s second in command, and assists with the running of the entire service. They are more hands on than the head chef in terms of food preparation, but will be starting to learn more about operations and administration.

 

Which senior jobs do chefs progress to?

Chefs or head chefs have many options for career progression both inside and outside the kitchen.

 

Executive chef

The executive or group chef is the highest rung in the kitchen hierarchy, and is a predominantly management role. Executive chefs may oversee the operations of multiple restaurants or venues, and focus more on menu design and the restaurant’s than actual cooking.

Restaurant manager

The restaurant manager role is responsible for overseeing the operations of both front of house and kitchen teams. They report to a general manager or owner, and can manage large teams of staff and operational budgets for the entire venue.

 

Chef job description – conclusion

Working as a chef can be a highly rewarding career path, bringing together a passion for cooking and working within a tight-knit team.

It is also an in-demand role with plenty of opportunities to constantly learn and improve skills and techniques.

Management accountant job description

Management accountants provide financial guidance, planning, and advice to management staff, with the aim of making their business more profitable.

They forecast revenue, provide insightful reports to leadership, and advise on the financial implications of strategic decisions.

Below is a detailed management accountant job description and a full job guide, including important qualifications, skills, and typical employers.

 

Guide contents

  • Management accountant Job Description
  • How much do management accountants earn?
  • What does a management accountant do?
  • Requirements, skills, and qualifications
  • Who employs management accountants?
  • Which junior jobs progress to management account roles?

 

Management accountant job description

Management Accountant | Fourpeople

 

About Fourpeople

Fourpeople is a leading digital business that works with entrepreneurial thinkers to introduce new products and ideas across e-commerce. It’s a fast-paced industry and we’re committed to offering excellent services to businesses trying to take their products online.

 

About the role

We’re looking for an experienced Management Accountant to provide timely and accurate financial insights to our leadership team, manage our financial processes and help us to make well informed strategic decisions.

 

Responsibilities

  • Produce and support the HoF with the monthly management accounts, and support in presentation to senior leadership
  • Budget and forecast production, including providing insight into areas where profitability can be improved
  • Review monthly costs with our budget holders and introduce cost savings where possible
  • Provide analytical reports to drive our business decisions, develop a strategy and manage financial risk
  • Present data to shareholders & potential investors, gain buy-in for new projects and investments

 

Location & Commitments

  • Permanent role with 40 hours a week
  • Location-based outside Guildford, remote work is possible in certain situations
  • Extra hours expected at end of the financial year

 

Candidate Requirements

  • Proven experience managing accounts for a large-scale commercial business
  • Experience with a range of accounting software, i.e QuickBooks, Sage X3, etc
  • Studied towards a professional designation in accounting, such as the CIMA or ACCA (these are not essential with demonstrated experience)
  • A strong work ethic and good people skills – we’re a friendly office

 

Contact Fourpeople

Are you an experienced management accountant looking to work in a fast-paced environment? Fourpeople is a successful e-commerce business that needs your help to succeed. To apply, please send an email to emily@fourpeople.com, our hiring manager.

 

How much do management accountants earn?

The salary of a management accountant can vary due to a variety of factors, but has a national average of £40,000.

 

Management accountant salaries in the UK

  • Low: £32,000
  • Average: £40,000
  • High: £47,000

Source: TotalJobs

 

Management Accountant Salaries vary depending on:

  • Employer industry – Does the accountant work for a retail brand, IT consultancy, or for local government?
  • Company size – Larger companies with higher revenues and complex finances will usually pay more than smaller companies
  • General salary factors – Such as level of candidate experience and location

Take this example – A senior management accountant working for a global bank in central London, will normally earn more than a junior one working for a small independent chain of restaurants in a small town.

These figures are averages taken from job adverts from the last year and are not fully representative of the extra perks, such as bonuses, overtime pay, or non-financial benefits.

 

What does a management accountant do?

Going beyond the jargon of a typical job description, here’s a quick breakdown of the main responsibilities of a management accountant throughout a typical week:

  • Studying financial data – Sift through data and find the details most relevant to the management team
  • Prepare reports, budgets, and statements – Once the data is analysed the management accountant will compile the findings in various forms, from budgets to financial predictions, to help management gain a clear picture of company financial health
  • Internal financial reviews – A management accountant manages all internal finances, including administration, finance tracking, and conducting finance audits in-house
  • Financial strategy advice – Based on data analysis, a management accountant may be called on to help upper-level management develop financial strategy for growth or to cut costs
  • People management – Management accountants may be in charge of a team of lower-level accountants, this involves providing workflows and direction of staff
  • Securing funding – a management accountant will provide financial information and predictions to shareholders and potential investors to gain funding for projects and investments
  • Income and expenditure management – Control income and expenditure to ensure profitability and
  • Analysing and managing risks – Identifying financial risks to the business and advising management on to reduce them
  • Develop new systems – Developing new financial systems in-house to adapt to internal and external changes

 

What do management accountants need?

candidate requirements

There’s no doubt that management accounting is a skilled role with significant responsibilities. Employers look for qualified management accountants with the right skillset and experience in the field.

Here’s a general rundown of the qualifications, skills, and personal qualities needed for a role as a management accountant.

 

Experience

Junior management accountant jobs – Junior management accounting roles will usually require the candidate to have a few years of experience in a less senior accounting role, such as accountant.

Intermediate to senior management accountant roles – These roles will require demonstrated experience in management accounting, and often experience within the particular field being worked in e.g. retail, insurance etc.

 

Management accountant skills

A variety of skills are needed to excel in the profession, here are some of the main ones;

  • Written communication: In a role that involves regular reporting to senior management, written communication is crucial
  • Commercial know-how: Management accounts require a deep understanding of how businesses work and make profits
  • Accuracy: Mistakes are not popular in accounting, even the smallest errors can have huge implications
  • Numeracy: As with any finance role, a good head for figures is extremely helpful
  • Analytical skills: Being able to assess raw financial data and turn it into meaningful insights for the business, is the core function of the job

And the more industry specific hard skills include:

  • Accounting and finance: A solid understanding of business finances and accounting methods are essential
  • Software: Accountants will be required to use accounting software such as Sage, Quickbooks, and data tools like Excel
  • Stakeholder management: The ability to manage the expectations of senior management and investors

 

Management accountant qualifications

Accounting is a strictly regulated line of work, so management accounts are expected to have relevant qualifications, such as the following:

 

CIMA

The most widely recognised management accounting qualification body is the Chartered Institute of Management Accounting. They provide a range of qualifications to support aspiring and experienced accountants perform their roles well.

  • The CIMA Certificate in Business Accounting (Cert BA) provides people with little or no accounting experience with a solid grounding in business economics and accounting.
  • The CIMA Professional Qualification provides a deeper level of training and equips management accountants to take on leadership roles within their fields.
  • CIMA also offer apprenticeship schemes where school leavers can learn on the job and gain qualifications at the same time

 

Certified Management Accountant

This professional designation can be earned to work towards a higher salary in the industry. Offered by the Institute of Management Accountants, this qualification is available to those who’ve completed a bachelor’s degree, a previous course, and worked for two continuous years in the industry.

 

Degrees

A degree in a related field such as business, accounting, finance or economics will provide a sound level of knowledge for management accountant roles.

 

What is expected of management accountants?

Management accountants are senior members of staff and as such, expectations from employers can be high.

  • Full-time hours – (35-40 hours a week) with potential overtime during project closure or the end of the tax year
  • Extended hours – May be required to meet financial reporting deadlines or close important projects
  • Financial targets – Some management accounts will be expected to achieve financial targets such as reducing spending or improving efficiency
  • Location – typically based in employer’s office with occasional travel for meetings with investors or colleagues

 

Management accountant benefits

Management accounts are a key member of a business’s team and will likely receive the benefits associated with that, including:

  • Pension scheme
  • Bonuses based on business performance
  • Healthcare
  • Car allowance
  • Paid study

 

 

Who employs management accountants?

Employers

Any medium to large company with a financial department needs a management accountant, making this a very high-demand role across a variety of industries. Whether it’s in the public or private sector there is a lot of demand across the UK

Typical management accountant employers include companies within:

  • Banking and finance
  • Transport
  • Retail
  • Health services
  • IT
  • Digital
  • Marketing

 

Which junior jobs progress to management accountant roles?

Stepping stone jobs

There are a number of entry-level jobs that can progress into a good step-up to management accounting:

 

Accountant

Working as a company accountant provides candidates with a solid grounding in basic accounting and financial record keeping – employees can choose to progress through to management accounting in larger businesses, or seek promotions externally.

Junior Internal Auditor

A junior internal auditor is responsible for analysing data and building reports on a company’s internal finances, often supporting a senior counterpart – the perfect experience for a training management accountant.

 

Which senior jobs do management accountants progress to?

Management accountants at the senior-end of their careers can be appointed a number of important roles in a business, such as:

 

Finance director

Finance directors are one of the most senior members of a business leadership team and oversee all of the financial activity and decision within that business.

Chief financial officer

A CFO is responsible for managing the total financial decisions of a company, including tracking cash flow, develop full-scale financial plans, and determining strengths and weaknesses in company’s finances.

 

Management accountant job description – conclusion

Management Accountants are highly in-demand across the UK in a range of industries.

With accessible qualifications and an above-average salary, if you are keen on numbers, work well with computer software, and have a naturally analytical mind, you could go far in the industry.

Production manager job description

Production managers direct the manufacturing process of products in factories, to ensure that high volumes of quality products are created within strict timelines and budgets.

They are also responsible for the health and safety of all staff under their management on the production line.

The role involves planning, monitoring and controlling the means of production to deliver products profitably and efficiently

This comprehensive guide includes a full production manager job description and everything else you need to know about the role, including salaries, qualifications, benefits and more.

 

Guide contents

  • Production manager job description
  • How much do production managers earn?
  • What does a production manager do?
  • Requirements, skills and qualifications
  • Who employs production managers?
  • Which junior jobs progress to production manager roles?

 

Production manager job description

Production manager |Fresh Food To You

 

About Fresh Food To You  

We are a leading food brand based in Glasgow, creating pre-prepared meals that can be purchased in the supermarket and enjoyed at home. Our extensive range of dishes has won awards and we cater for a variety of diets including vegan and gluten-free.

 

About the role

We are looking for a production manager to manage the delivery of our premium product meal range, and meet the high-quality standards expected by our customers, within expected budget and time frames.

 

Responsibilities

  • Planning and organising production schedules to ensure orders are delivered on time
  • Managing a team of staff including production supervisors and quality inspectors, as well as staff rotas and performance management
  • Ensuring all products meet established quality standards with rigorous checks
  • Allocating resources across workflows to ensure minimum wastage and strengthen profit margins
  • Offering suggestions for efficiency improvements as part of the overall business strategy
  • Enforcing all health and safety regulations and training staff when necessary
  • Overseeing the selection and maintenance of production equipment
  • Providing regular updates on key milestones and reports for senior management and clients

 

Location & commitments

  • Permanent, full-time position
  • Based just outside Glasgow city centre
  • Some travel required when meeting with suppliers or clients

 

Candidate requirements

  • Proven experience working as a production manager within the food sector
  • Understanding of quality standards and health & safety regulations
  • Experience managing teams, including onboarding, training and performance management
  • Experience using ERP software, project management tools and MS Office
  • Excellent analytical skills and commercial acumen

 

Contact us to apply

If you’d like to join our team and support our vision of providing fresh, healthy meals to busy people, send your CV and cover letter to Peter Bates at peter@freshfood.co.uk

 

How much do production managers earn?

Production managers are normally well paid with an average salary of £37,500 with the potential to earn significantly more with career progression.

 

Production manager salaries in the UK

  • Low: £28,750
  • Average: £37,500
  • High: £42,500

Source: Totaljobs

 

Production manager salaries will vary depending on;

  • Product being produced – e.g. Is the factory producing snacks, computers, clothing etc.?
  • Size of production line – e.g. Is the manager responsible for producing hundreds of products per week, or thousands?
  • General salary factors – such as level of experience and location of the work

For example, a production manager leading a production line of 100,000 complex computers per month, will command a higher salary than another who is overseeing the production of 5,000 basic t-shirts per month.

Bear in mind that these are average figures taken from job advert samples, and they do not include extra benefits such as bonuses, overtime and non-financial benefits such as healthcare.

 

What does a production manager do?

Breaking down the job description jargon, here are the typical tasks and responsibilities that production managers will carry out in an average work week;

  • Planning schedules – Drawing up production schedules including preparing orders, estimating timescales and allocating resources.
  • Monitoring schedules – Overseeing production schedules and ensuring products will be delivered on time.
  • People management – Supervising a team of workers including creating their shift rosters and ensuring personal targets are met.
  • Budget management – Estimating and agreeing budgets with clients and managers, then making sure production is delivered within that fixed cost.
  • Optimising production – Reviewing production levels and implementing changes that will boost efficiency, safety or profitability
  • Reporting – Collating and analysing data, then creating production reports for factory managers and clients.
  • Health and safety – Creating a safe workplace where health and safety regulations are adhered to.
  • Selecting and monitoring equipment – Checking all production equipment is routinely maintained and repaired when required.

 

What do production managers need?

candidate requirements

Production managers require a range of skills, experience and knowledge to deliver their roles.

Specific requirements will often depend on the industry and products being produced, as well as the seniority of the role. In general, here’s what’s needed to fulfil the role of a production manager.

 

Experience

Junior PM jobs will require candidates to demonstrate an understanding of production processes and knowledge of quality standards as well as health and safety. They will most likely have stepped up from a production supervisor role.

Intermediate to senior PM roles will generally require candidates to have overseen complex production processes. They may also have gained significant experience in a particular sector, such as electronics or automotive.

 

Production manager skills

The following is a list of skills that are essential to successfully deliver the role of a production manager.

  • Project management: Ensuring production schedules are implemented on time and to budget
  • Communication: Written and verbal communication with staff, clients and external providers
  • Leadership: Motivating and inspiring team members to work together to achieve personal and production goals
  • Multi-tasking: Being able to work across a number of different production processes at once
  • Performance management: Driving individual and team performance against KPIs, and coaching under-performing staff
  • Problem solving: Dealing with unexpected project issues to reduce or eliminate their effect on the success of the project

And the more industry specific hard skills include;

  • Production process: Solid understanding of the manufacturing process, planning and optimisation
  • Industry knowledge: Knowledge of manufacturing production and processes within their field; e.g. automotive, retail, food etc.
  • Machinery knowledge: Ability to operate, repair and maintain production machinery

 

Production manager qualifications

Formal qualifications are not mandatory to get a job as a production manager, with the chance to start a career as a trainee or apprentice.

However, there are professional qualifications that can help upskill candidates already working in the industry or help those who want to move into production management.

 

Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT) Certificates

CILT offers a number of different certificates, from the Level 3 Certificate in Operations Management which is an introduction to production and operations management, to the Level 6 Advanced Diploma in Operations Management, aimed at more senior managers.

 

Institute of Operations Management (IOM) Certificates

IOM has a Level 3 Certificate in Operations Management which is delivered through distance learning. There are three compulsory units including Business for Operations Managers, Improvement Techniques for Operations Management and Demand and Supply Chain Management.

 

Sector-specific qualifications

Some employers will also seek industry-specific training and qualifications, for example a job in the food industry may require a degree in food science or chemistry.

 

What is expected of production managers?

Typically, production manager will be expected to commit to the following;

  • Full time hours – (35 – 40 hours per week) with occasional overtime required when production deadlines are nearing
  • Unsocial hours – including shift work and the need to be on call for dealing with emergencies
  • Location – Generally based on production site with occasional travel to head office or other company buildings

 

 

Production manager benefits

Production managers can expect to receive benefits including:

  • Bonuses – based on project performance
  • Pension
  • Healthcare
  • Car allowance
  • Corporate discounts

 

Who employs production managers?

Employers

Most large manufacturing and processing organisations will employ a production manager to ensure their products are delivered efficiently and to a high quality.

In smaller companies, the duties of a production manager may be combined with another function.

Typical production manager employers include companies within:

  • Food processing
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Aerospace and defence
  • Electronics
  • Automobile
  • Chemical engineering
  • Printing
  • Textiles

 

Which junior jobs progress to production manager roles?

Stepping stone jobs

In order to progress to the level of production manager, candidates will need to have gained experience in roles overseeing production processes or quality control. These roles include:

 

Production supervisor

A production supervisor oversees a small section of the delivery of a production process, and monitors the established work flow – the natural promotion is to take over the management of the entire process by becoming the production manager.

Material planner

A material planner coordinates and supplies raw materials and resources within a manufacturing process, as well as managing inventory and stock levels.

 

Which senior jobs do production managers progress to?

Production managers are in a good position to progress to general management positions or specialise in a specific sector. Career opportunities include:

 

Operations manager

The operations manager is responsible for the operational day-to-day running of the business including overseeing different departments such as manufacturing, purchasing and warehousing.

General manager

General managers are responsible for establishing and achieving business goals such as area sales targets and staff performance.

 

Production manager job description – conclusion

Production manager is a varied and highly skilled role that offers opportunities to gain experience across a range of sectors or specialise in one area.

Not only does it offer a good salary now, but it is a springboard to general management positions in the future.

Property manager job description

Property managers maintain rental properties for landlords and tenants, and ensure that both parties are adhering to the terms of the tenancy agreement

They are responsible for collecting rent payments, producing contracts and overseeing property maintenance.

This detailed guide includes a full property manager job description and everything else you need to know about property managers, including salaries, skills, qualifications, typical employers and more.

 

Guide contents

  • Property manager job description
  • How much do property managers earn?
  • What does a property manager do?
  • Requirements, skills and qualifications
  • Who employs property managers?
  • Which junior jobs progress to property manager roles?

 

Property manager job description

Property manager |Shut the Front Door

 

About Shut the Front Door

We are a leading residential property management company with buildings located across the UK over 2,000 tenancies under management.

 

About the role

An exciting opportunity has arisen for a dedicated property manager to maintain the condition of our properties and look after the needs of tenants and landlords, across our South East residential locations.

 

Responsibilities

  • Managing tenancies and properties, including tours, payments and check ins / outs
  • Producing high-quality, detailed inventory reports and carrying out property inspections
  • Ensuring properties are compliant with buildings and local council regulations
  • Preparing tenancy agreements, making amendments and distributing to landlords and tenants
  • Booking gas certificates, EICRs and EPCs for our properties
  • Liaising with tenants, landlords and property management teams to resolve issues swiftly
  • Liaising with contractors to manage repairs and maintenance at properties
  • Minimising landlord expenditure while maintaining their properties
  • Processing end of tenancy notices and advising lettings team of any properties coming available
  • Arranging the return of deposits and other financial and administration duties

 

Location & commitments

  • Permanent
  • Full-time
  • 9am-5.30pm, Monday to Friday
  • Working from spacious, modern offices in central Canterbury, Kent
  • Occasional evening and weekend work as required

 

Candidate requirements

  • Experience of managing residential properties
  • Knowledge of current tenancy laws and buildings landlord requirements
  • UK driving licence and own car
  • Excellent communication skills, both written and verbal
  • Sound numerical and IT skills, with Microsoft Office experience
  • ARLA qualification is not essential but would be an advantage

 

Contact us to apply

Please apply with a CV and covering letter outlining your suitability for the role, sent to thebigboss@shutthefrontdoor.com

 

How much do property managers earn?

Property management is a reasonably well-paid profession, with an average salary of £32,500 and plenty of scope for career progression

 

Property manager salaries in the UK

  • Low: £25,000
  • Average: £32,500
  • High: £37,500

Source: Totaljobs

 

Property manager salaries will vary depending on:

  • Type of properties being managed – e.g. residential homes or commercial offices
  • Location and value of the properties – e.g. Central London property portfolios are more valuable and often offer higher salaries
  • General salary factors – such as level of candidate qualifications, experience and location

For example, a senior property manager managing a large portfolio of commercial, city centre properties will normally earn more than a junior property manager working on a selection of small residential properties in a suburban location.

Bear in mind that these are average figures taken from job advert samples, and they do not include extra benefits such as bonuses, overtime and non-financial benefits such as healthcare.

 

What does a property manager do?

Breaking down the job description jargon, here are the typical tasks and responsibilities that property managers will carry out in average work week:

  • Carrying out Inspections – Visiting properties to ensure they are properly maintained by tenants
  • Managing tenants – Handling enquires, resolving issues and arranging check ins and check outs
  • Managing rental contracts – Preparing contracts and making sure they are adhered to, updating and amending where needed, and gaining signatures
  • Contract renewals – Negotiating new contract terms with tenants on behalf of landlords
  • Inventories – Preparing reports of property condition for new tenants, checking them at checkouts and updating them between tenancies
  • Managing utilities – Making sure utilities (gas, water, electricity) are set up and checked regularly
  • Maintenance and repairs – Overseeing maintenance duties and ensuring the property remains in good condition and follows buildings regulations
  • Admin and communication – Dealing with tenant queries and issues, keeping owners up to date, screening tenants, collecting rent and handling payment problems

 

What do property managers need?

Employers

Property managers need a range of skills, experience, knowledge and sometimes qualifications in order to carry out the job effectively.

Exact requirements will depend on the type of properties managed, but generally speaking… here’s what’s needed.

 

Experience

Assistant Property Managers will usually require administrative and secretarial experience. A good understanding of construction, electrical, heating and other building systems is useful.

Senior Property Managers will usually need extensive property management experience, and a solid knowledge of lettings and property management processes.

 

Property manager skills

Property managers need a blend of skills to be able to manage properties effectively and on budget, these include the following:

  • Communication: Polite and courteous written and verbal communication with tenants, prospective tenants and landlords/property owners
  • Detailed and organised: Paying attention to details (e.g. In contracts) and keeping organised (e.g. Managing tradespeople, tour appointments)
  • Flexible: Property management may involve working outside of traditional office hours (e.g. Weekend and evening tours for prospective tenants)
  • Problem solving: Dealing with unexpected issues to reduce or eliminate their effect on the property
  • Good initiative: Landlords will expect you to be able to make logical, sensible decisions on their behalf. You need to be able to prioritise your own work – this is not a job for people who need to be told what to do next.
  • Professional manner: In attitude, dress and communication style

And the more industry specific “hard skills” include:

  • Property knowledge: knowledge across the property spectrum including maintenance, cleaning, utilities etc.
  • Contract law: An understanding of the legal requirements for tenancy agreements for both landlord and tenants

 

Property manager qualifications

Qualifications are not essential to work as a property manager, as many employers value experience and skills over qualifications.

However, there are a number of property management qualifications that are recognised across the profession and will help candidates to land jobs, in addition to helping them perform better in their roles. Many job adverts specify that candidates have a recognised qualification, particularly for senior roles.

 

ARLA

Propertymark Qualifications is the UK’s specialist awarding organisation offering industry recognised and regulated qualifications in property.

Their portfolio of nationally recognised qualifications and programmes may help those starting a career in property or to support the continued professional development of those working in the sector.

The Level 3 Award in Residential Letting & Property Management – England & Wales is an introductory qualification that is ideal for candidates wanting to gain or improve existing knowledge. It is accepted as training criteria for Rent Smart Wales.

ARLA requires candidates to hold specific Association of Residential Letting Agents ARLA Qualifications in order to join their membership organisation as a full member.

 

NFoPP

The National Federation of Property Professionals delivers qualifications that some Senior Property Manager roles require. They offer a range of respected and well-established letting agent qualifications suited to everyone, regardless of their previous experience.

 

IRPM

The Institute of Residential Property Management (IRPM) is the professional body for property management professionals and is dedicated to supporting, building, and setting the standards of the profession.

 

A qualification from the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) or the Institute of Workplace and Facilities Management (IWFM) may also be of benefit in any property related role.

 

Specialist property qualifications

It can be beneficial for property managers to hold qualifications in the subject of the types of property they will be managing. For example, a residential property manager working on leasehold properties could benefit from the IRPM Level 3 Leasehold Property Management qualification. Some sectors may require experience of particular aspects of property law (e.g. Section 21 and Section 8 eviction procedures for residential lettings property managers).

 

What is expected of property managers?

Typically, property managers will be expected to commit the following;

  • Full time hours – (35 – 40 hours per week) with occasional overtime required when needed
  • Possibility of occasional evening or weekend work where property work maintenance needs to be carried out outside of the employer’s core business hours
  • Location – Normally based at an agency office
  • Regular travel to property sites to oversee work, conduct check ins/outs and inspections

 

Property manager benefits

Benefits packages will vary according to the type of employer, and those working for larger companies will generally receive larger remuneration packages.

Examples of possible benefits include:

  • Flexible working hours
  • Pension
  • Healthcare
  • Pension
  • Car allowance and business mileage
  • Corporate discounts
  • Funded team events

 

 

Who employs property managers?

Employers

Most companies who lease residential or commercial property will require a property manager to manage the administration of the rental agreements, liaise with tenants, and ensure the properties are well maintained.

Typical property management employers include:

  • Lettings agents
  • Estate agents
  • Office space providers
  • Property management companies
  • Chartered surveyors

 

Which junior jobs progress to property manager roles?

Stepping stone jobs

Aside from trainee/graduate programmes, there are a number of jobs which see employees naturally progress into property manager roles. These include:

 

Property administrator

A junior property staff member, responsible for managing administrative tasks on properties, such as updating documents and arranging appointments for tradespeople and tenants – usually reporting to a property manager.

 

Which senior jobs do property managers progress to?

Even though property management is a great career choice in its own right, it can also be a springboard into more senior and higher paid jobs, such as:

 

Senior Property Manager

Senior roles may include managing larger portfolios or buildings, such as residential blocks or large office facilities. They may be the highest-level manager assigned to an individual property, managing other property managers or making higher-level decisions.

Director

Some property managers progress into senior management positions, such as directorship roles at a property management firm or estate agencies.

 

Property manager job description – conclusion

Property manager is a highly varied job with strong demand across the UK from a wide range of employers in the property sector.

It pays above the current national average salary, offers challenging and rewarding work as well as plenty of attractive career progression opportunities.

Financial analyst job description

Financial analysts help organisations to make informed financial decisions by analysing a company’s financial performance, and making recommendations to management teams, based on their findings

They collect financial data, organise it, analyse it and turn it into reports and forecasts that can be interpreted by senior staff.

This detailed guide includes a full financial analyst job description and everything you need to know about the role including salaries, opportunities for progression and daily responsibilities.

 

Guide contents

  • Financial analyst job description
  • How much do financial analysts earn?
  • What does a financial analyst do?
  • Requirements, skills and qualifications
  • Who employs financial analysts?
  • Which junior jobs progress to financial analyst roles?

 

Financial analyst job description

Financial analyst |The Fresh Juice Company

 

About The Fresh Juice Company

We are pioneers in the fresh juice and smoothie industry, with shopfronts across the country selling healthy, refreshing drinks. Our award-winning drinks are also available in supermarkets so you’re never too far from a Fresh Juice boost!

 

About the role

We are looking for a financial analyst who can create and maintain financial models that help our business to make informed decisions. You will work closely with our senior management team and provide timely information such as financial reporting, analysis and forecasting.

 

Responsibilities

  • Collecting, organising and analysing financial data from a range of internal and external sources
  • Creating different financial models including Discounted Cash Flow (DCF), Option Pricing and Three Statement model
  • Preparing monthly financial reports to support senior management in making decisions in line with the organisation’s business strategy
  • Identifying and analysing market trends and providing updates to senior managers
  • Overseeing quarterly forecasting and annual budgeting for the business
  • Working closely with department heads and developing regular performance reports to help identify areas for improvement
  • Undertaking ad hoc analysis projects, as briefed by senior management
  • Working with external auditors in response to audit queries
  • Developing tools to support departments with decision making

 

Location & commitments

  • Permanent, full-time role working 37.5 hours per week
  • Some travel required
  • Located in our central London offices

 

Candidate requirements

Essential:

  • Solid analytical and modelling skills
  • Strong commercial acumen and business awareness
  • Comfortable dealing with and influencing senior business stakeholders
  • Ability to analyse and present data to produce meaningful information
  • Bachelor’s degree in Finance/Accounting
  • Advanced MS Excel and PowerPoint skills

Desirable:

  • ACA/CIMA/ACCA (or equivalent) qualified

 

Contact us to apply

If you think you are a good match for this role, please send your CV and cover letter to our HR Manager Rachel Bentley at rachel@fresh-juice.co.uk

 

How much do financial analysts earn?

Financial analysts are in high demand, so they can usually command good salaries, with an average of £47,500.

 

Financial analyst salaries in the UK

  • Low: £37,500
  • Average: £47,500
  • High: £57,500

Source: Totaljobs

 

Financial analyst salaries will vary depending on;

  • The type of employer – e.g. is the role for one of the top investment banking firms or in a retail organisation?
  • Qualifications – financial analysts with accounting qualifications, such as ACA, ACCA or CIMA can command higher salaries than those without
  • General salary factors – such as level of candidate experience and location

For example, an ACA-qualified financial analyst working for a London investment bank can expect to earn a higher salary than a less experienced financial analyst working at a regional retailer.

 

What does a financial analyst do?

Breaking down the job description jargon, here are the typical tasks and responsibilities that financial analysts will carry out in an average work week;

  • Collecting financial data – Compiling data from across the organisation as well as external sources
  • Organising data – Cleaning and sorting data in preparation for analysis
  • Analysing results – Identifying trends and potential efficiencies to improve company performance
  • Market analysis – Keeping across trends in the employer’s market and identifying opportunities and risks for the organisation
  • Financial modelling – Using mathematical models to estimate and test the performance of an asset or the business as a whole
  • Forecasting – Developing tools and models to predict revenue changes and shifts in expenditure
  • Advising management – Working with senior management or division heads to provide sound recommendations
  • Process improvement – Reviewing existing financial procedures and developing recommendations to improve business operations
  • Reporting – Compiling and creating monthly reports for senior management including financial results and performance against key metrics

 

What do financial analysts need?

candidate requirements

Financial analysts need a range of personal and technical skills to deliver their jobs effectively.

Exact requirements will depend on each job, as well as the work setting, but generally speaking here’s what’s needed.

 

Experience

Junior financial analysts are usually employed straight from university with little experience outside of work placements. They may be hired as part of a graduate scheme or another entry-level analyst position.

Intermediate to senior financial analysts will need to demonstrate previous analyst experience working directly with senior management. They will need to have had experience producing reports and presenting findings that have improved company performance.

 

Financial analyst skills

Some required skills will depend on the specialism and work setting where the role will be carried out, but the following is a list of core skills for financial analysts.

  • Collecting and organising financial data – Sourcing, sorting and organising data from a range of internal and external sources
  • Data analysis: Reviewing compiled data and turning it into useful insights and recommendations for senior management
  • Financial modelling: Creating financial modelling systems to analyse data, make forecasts and identify risks
  • Strategic thinking: Developing innovative solutions to improve performance and market share
  • Communication skills: Ability to translate complex financial matters and effectively communicate to a wide range of stakeholders and staff
  • Attention to detail: Ensuring all financial records and models are accurate
  • Market knowledge: Keeping abreast of market trends and using that knowledge to make recommendations
  • Software knowledge: Advanced MS Office skills, particularly Excel, as well as financial modelling software
  • Reporting and presenting: Submitting timely and accurate reports, and being able to confidently present findings and recommendations to management

 

Financial analyst qualifications

Most financial analyst roles will require undergraduate degrees as a minimum, with some employers seeking candidates with Master’s degrees as well.

There are also a range of post-graduate qualifications available that can enhance a candidate’s earning potential and put them in a more advantageous position when applying for jobs.

 

Bachelor’s or Master’s degrees

Financial analysts will be expected to have completed formal university qualifications in an area such as accountancy, finance, economics, mathematics or business administration.

 

Accountancy and finance qualifications

Post-graduate qualifications include becoming an Associate Chartered Accountant (ACA), Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) or Chartered Institute of Management Accountant (CIMA). These qualifications are globally recognised and are usually undertaken while candidates are working.

 

What is expected of financial analysts?

Typically, financial analysts will be expected to commit the following;

  • Full time work – 40+ hours per week
  • Some overtime and evening work – Especially during peak times such as end of financial year or when projects are due
  • Location – Office based

 

Financial analyst benefits

Financial analysts usually work for corporate organisations offering good benefits including:

  • Car allowance
  • Mobile phone allowance
  • Performance-based bonuses
  • Pension
  • Healthcare
  • Training and development

 

 

Who employs financial analysts?

Employers

Financial analysts will often work for banks, stock brokerages, investment firms and insurance companies.

However, many medium to large businesses will also employ financial analysts to support their business planning and improve financial decision making.

Here are some examples of industries where financial analysts are employed:

  • Financial services
  • Insurance
  • Professional services
  • Public sector
  • Universities
  • Property
  • Healthcare
  • Retail
  • FMCG
  • Utilities
  • Media
  • Industrial and manufacturing

 

Which junior jobs progress to financial analyst roles?

Financial analysts are often recruited directly from university without much practical workplace experience, outside of work placements. Junior financial analysts will be provided with on-the-job training but many of their day-to-day tasks will be putting theoretical models and forecasting skills into practice.

 

Which senior jobs do financial analysts progress to?

Promotions

Financial analysts will gain exposure to how businesses operate and ways to improve performance and profitability. This puts them in a good position to progress to more senior operational positions within an organisation, such as:

 

Finance manager

Finance managers are responsible for maintaining the financial health of a business or department. They prepare statements and reports to support long-term financial planning, and supervise a team of finance employees.

Financial Planning and Analysis (FP&A) manager

FP&A managers develop financial plans in conjunction with senior management to improve the overall profitability and efficiency of an organisation.

 

Financial analyst job description – conclusion

Financial analysts are highly in demand across the UK, and the role offer a rewarding and interesting career pathway for people interested in finance and mathematics.

There are also ample opportunities for advancement in the banking and finance sector, or into general management positions within other organisations.

Similar jobs: AccountantFinance assistant

Digital marketing executive job description

Digital marketers are responsible for driving awareness of a company’s products and services via digital channels such as online advertising and social media.

Working within the marketing team, they plan and execute digital campaigns, monitor their success and report results back to business leadership.

This comprehensive guide includes a full digital marketing job description and everything else you want to know about digital marketers including job prospects, qualifications and salaries.

 

Guide contents

  • Digital marketing job description
  • How much do digital marketers earn?
  • What does a digital marketer do?
  • Requirements, skills and qualifications
  • Who employs digital marketers?
  • Which junior jobs progress to digital marketer roles?

 

Digital marketer job description

Digital Marketing |Pout Cosmetics

 

About Pout Cosmetics

We are a beauty and cosmetics company who produce ethical, animal-cruelty-free products which we ship to customers across the globe. Our product range includes our award-winning, long-wear lipsticks and quick-dry nail polish.

 

About the role

We are looking for an experienced digital marketer who can plan and manage all of our digital marketing channels and campaigns. You will report to the Marketing Director and contribute to the organisation’s marketing strategy to increase customer sales and engagement.

 

Responsibilities

  • Developing and executing the organisation’s annual digital marketing plan, including PPC, SEO, Social Media, Affiliates and Display/Re-targeting
  • Devising innovative digital marketing campaigns, that feed into the organisation’s overarching marketing strategy
  • Creating engaging digital content that increases customer engagement and enhances the organisation’s online brand
  • Implementing strategies to drive traffic to the organisation’s website, including SEO and PPC
  • Creating and implementing a social media policy and framework for the organisation
  • Moderating all social media platforms including Twitter, Instagram and Facebook
  • Managing the digital marketing budget, including allocating budgets across different channels and platforms
  • Producing regular digital dashboards for the Head of Marketing, reporting progress against set KPIs
  • Working closely with colleagues in sales and IT to ensure all activity is integrated

 

Location & commitments

  • Permanent, full time position
  • Fun, flexible work environment in Manchester
  • Office-based with occasional travel required and option to work from home

 

Candidate requirements

Essential:

  • Proven experience managing a digital marketing function for an organisation
  • Strong track record implementing successful digital marketing campaigns
  • Experience using content management systems
  • Knowledge of website analytics tools, for example Google Analytics
  • Experience in setting up and optimising Google Adwords campaigns
  • Bachelor’s degree in marketing or business

Desirable:

  • Experience using Adobe Creative Suite
  • Working knowledge of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript

 

Contact us to apply

If you’d like to combine your love of beauty, ethical products and digital marketing, please contact our HR Manager, Marie, at marie.bateson@pout.co.uk

 

How much do digital marketing professionals earn?

Generally speaking, digital marketing is a well-paid profession with an average salary of £37,500 and plenty career progression opportunities.

 

Digital marketer salaries in the UK

  • Low: £27,000
  • Average: £37,500
  • High: £52,500

Source: Totaljobs

 

Digital marketer salaries will vary hugely depending on;

  • The industry of the employer – e.g. a role in a professional services or banking organisation will pay better than a charity
  • Size and type of campaigns – e.g. does the role oversee multi-channel, global digital campaigns with extensive budgets or small regional campaigns
  • Area of specialisation – e.g. Digital marketers can specialise in one or more digital channels such as display advertising, social media or email marketing
  • General salary factors – such as the level of candidate experience and location

 

For example, a digital marketing professional working for an accountancy firm in London with significant experience in content strategy and e-commerce ,will earn more than a generalist digital marketer working in the public sector.

 

What does a digital marketer do?

Breaking down the job description jargon, here are the typical tasks and responsibilities that digital marketers will carry out in an average work week;

  • Campaign management – Planning and executing digital marketing campaigns including:
    • Search Engine Optimisation (SEO): Improving company website’s position in search engine rankings to drive visitors
    • Pay Per Click (PPC): Planning and optimizing paid advertising placements across relevant websites
    • Email marketing: Driving traffic, leads and sales via targeted email campaigns to customers
    • Social media marketing: using social platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat to create brand awareness and loyalty
    • Video marketing: Creating videos to attract and engage target audience on platforms like YouTube and TikTok
  • Budget management – Allocating funds across different digital marketing channels to ensure the best ROI.
  • Creating content – Planning content calendars across channels to ensure digital platforms are populated with engaging content that represents the organisation’s brand.
  • Copywriting – Writing engaging content including social media posts, blogs, online articles and ad copy.
  • Stakeholder management – Managing relationships with internal teams and external suppliers such as digital marketing agencies and affiliate networks.
  • Data analysis – Using analytics software to monitor performance of campaigns and making adjustments to improve performance.
  • Reporting – Creating regular reports and dashboards for senior staff measuring campaign performance and ROI.

 

What do digital marketing executives need?

candidate requirements

Digital marketers need a range of technical skills and experience to perform their roles effectively.

There will be some differences in requirements depending on the level of the job and the industry of the organisation, but here’s a basic overview of what’s needed.

 

Experience

Junior or entry level digital marketers will often progress from an assistant type role within a marketing department or agency, after gaining a basic understanding of digital marketing. School leavers and graduates could potentially land a digital marketing role with no experience, if they have undertaken some digital marketing qualifications or training.

Mid-level to senior digital marketers will need to have gained several years’ experience working in-house for a company or for a digital agency. Sometimes, generalist marketers can move into digital roles if they can demonstrate a good understanding of channels and campaigns.

 

Digital marketing skills

Aside from the industry specific skills mentioned above (like planning, budgeting etc), the following more generic or “soft” skills are also vital for digital marketers.

  • Strategic thinking: Creating strategies and plans that are designed to achieve strategic business goals and objectives
  • Communication: Written and verbal communication with staff, stakeholders and external parties
  • Creativity: Devising innovative strategies, writing engaging content and producing video, audio and image content
  • Project management: Ensuring campaigns and content calendars are implemented on time and to budget
  • Multi-tasking: Being able to work across a number of different projects at once

Digital marketers will also benefit from the following industry-specific skills

  • Analytics and reporting: Ability to use tracking and reporting software, and make adjustments to campaigns to improve success
  • Marketing knowledge: Understanding of key concepts of marketing including audience segmentation, consumer behaviour and channels to best distribute and promote the product or service
  • Digital marketing channels: Specialist knowledge in core channels and marketing techniques including SEO, PPC, social media, email marketing and affiliate marketing

The following software is also important in a number of digital roles:

  • Web analytics: Used to track website visitor numbers and behaviour, e.g. Google Analytics
  • SEO keyword tools: For researching organic traffic figures and estimating competitor website traffic, e.g. Moz, SEMrush
  • PPC Platforms: Pay per click advertising platforms such as Facebook ads and Google Adwords
  • Content management systems (CMS): Platforms for organising and publishing web content such as blogs. E.g. WordPress
  • Email marketing tools: Software for creating and sending email campaigns to subscribers. e.g. Mailchimp
  • Social media platforms: Knowing how to grow followings on Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat etc.

 

Digital marketing qualifications

Digital marketing positions may require candidates to have completed some kind of formal qualification in business or marketing.

There are also a range of post-graduate qualifications available where candidates can specialise in digital marketing.

 

CAM Diploma in Digital Marketing

This course is designed for people working in marketing communications already, or who hold a degree in another field and want to retrain. It is made up of three units including two compulsory topics covering marketing and consumer behaviour and digital marketing essentials. Students can then choose their final module in areas such as digital marketing planning and web analytics.

 

CIM Level 4 – Certificate in Professional Marketing (Digital)

The Chartered Institute of Marketing runs this course to help marketers specialise in digital marketing. Students will need to pass two mandatory modules and one elective module to gain the qualification. Mandatory modules include applied marketing and planning campaigns, while elective modules cover digital marketing techniques. The CIM also has a Level 6 Diploma of Professional Digital Marketing.

 

IDM Professional Diploma in Digital Marketing

The IDM’s diploma course covers a diverse range of topics including integrated planning for omnichannel campaigns and measuring and optimising omnichannel marketing. It is designed for people working in marketing who are looking to improve their knowledge of digital marketing.

 

What is expected of digital marketers?

Typically, digital marketer will be expected to commit to the following;

  • Full time hours – (35 – 40 hours per week) with occasional evening work required
  • Location – Normally based at employer office
  • Some travel to meet suppliers and stakeholders

 

Digital marketing benefits

Digital marketing professionals work across a range of industries, usually larger companies with established marketing functions, so generally receive good benefits including:

  • Performance-related bonuses
  • Pension
  • Healthcare
  • Corporate discounts
  • Team events and trips

 

 

Who employs digital marketers?

Employers

Almost all companies will have a digital marketing function nowadays, and  many are increasingly seeking the expertise of digital marketing professionals.

More than ever, consumers are researching and purchasing products online so it’s essential that companies have a strong online presence, which means that digital marketers are in high demand across the private and public sector.

There are also a large number of digital marketing agencies across the UK, who provide outsourced digital marketing services to other businesses.

Typical digital marketer employers include companies within:

  • Marketing and advertising agencies
  • Professional firms such as accountancy and law
  • Retail
  • Health
  • Training and Education
  • FMCG
  • Automotive
  • Gaming and gambling
  • Entertainment
  • Beauty
  • Telecoms
  • Travel and leisure

 

 

Which junior jobs progress to digital marketing executive roles?

The career pathway in creative industries is relatively linear, and most employees will start in a junior role and progress up the ranks over time. Junior roles include:

 

Digital marketing assistant

Digital marketing assistants are entry-level roles that require supporting a wider marketing team with administrative duties. They may also be involved in creating content for social media posts and updating reports.

 

Which senior jobs do digital marketing executives progress to?

Promotions

There are a number of roles for digital marketing professionals to progress to, including:

 

Digital marketing manager

This role will be responsible for a team of digital marketing professionals within a company and also the planning and managing of their overall digital marketing strategy.

Head of marketing

The head of marketing will oversee all marketing activity for the organisation, including both digital and traditional media. They may also oversee teams of salespeople and other functions such as web development and UX.

 

Digital marketing job description – conclusion

Digital marketing is a growth area that is highly in demand due to the changing digital landscape.

It is a dynamic industry with many exciting developments and ideal for a seasoned marketer who is looking to specialise or a digital native entering the workforce.

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